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OneHallyu

The Random Thought Thread


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Loooooool he's an ex for a reason. If I had to listen to what my exes had to say about me, my self esteem wouldn't just be low it would be non-existent. Exes are butthurt by definition especially if they're not the ones who broke up with you :imstupid:

 

Plus, as long as you're hot, men don't give a fuck about your shitty personality or anger issues. They just want ass and boobs.

 

 

Loooooool you must be horny, you're just lying to yourself.

 

It wasn't hilarious. I fucking hate rats. and it was big af. Plus I was cold and it was a prison cell. I have no idea where it came from.

It had this dream when I was like 16, it was so vivid I still remember every single bit yeaars later.

 

PS: I hate cheese. It's disgusting.

Lol I was the one who broke it off, I can tell he's butthurt.

Sadly I am not hot though, I can work on the body but not on the face!

 

I AM NOT HORNY! I never had a thing for anything sexual except in my dreams! I don't need a man, my dreams are lies. 

Were you a bad kid at that age? that dream might have scared you off, jail isn't a nice place but they offer free food hahaha. In your case free cheese and a nice rat roommate

 

I dislike cheese too it's really gross.

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I laugh so hard every time a yg Stan says this is smhallyu when the big bang and winner NB got locked for fighting and getting off topic with ikonics and ic when the pann about baekhyun is not locked

.

If I ever see an SNSD / Jessica fan complain about too many charting threads again...

Lol I was the one who broke it off, I can tell he's butthurt.

Sadly I am not hot though, I can work on the body but not on the face!

 

I AM NOT HORNY! I never had a thing for anything sexual except in my dreams! I don't need a man, my dreams are lies. 

Were you a bad kid at that age? that dream might have scared you off, jail isn't a nice place but they offer free food hahaha. In your case free cheese and a nice rat roommate

 

I dislike cheese too it's really gross.

 

Me neither. Let's be the ugly buddies :datass:

If you were the one who broke up with him then yes he's definitely butthurt. They always are.

 

Bad kid is putting it lightly :derp: . I only started to calm the fuck down at 21+ LOL.

 You mean was I scared of going to jail? The illegal things I did didn't really warrant me going to prison (at least I don't think so).

 

I wanna ask you something, i'll pm you.

Edited by Bitch Craft
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If babies are in the womb for 9 months, why aren't they 9 years old when they are born?

 

Is the s or the c silent in scent?

 

Is there a certain reason the alphabet has to be in a certain order?

 

If Cinderella's shoe fit perfectly why did it fall off?

Is Ke$ha named Ke£ha in England?

What's the definition of definition?

What does water taste like?

 

If Apple made a car, would it still have windows?

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Share on other sites

If babies are in the womb for 9 months, why aren't they 9 years old when they are born?

 

Is the s or the c silent in scent?

 

Is there a certain reason the alphabet has to be in a certain order?

 

If Cinderella's shoe fit perfectly why did it fall off?

Is Ke$ha named Ke£ha in England?

What's the definition of definition?

What does water taste like?

 

If Apple made a car, would it still have windows?

 

 

If babies are in the womb for 9 months, why aren't they 9 years old when they are born?

 

Sure, technically. In some cultures (like certain Asian cultures), they count the time in the womb with your chronological birth age.

 

When it comes to babies in utero, there is an age of viability (the point at which a fetus can survive outside the womb). Before then, while it may definitely be alive, have a beating heart, and be human, for sure, it cannot survive outside of the mother's body. Since this point of viability is extremely variable depending on other criteria, the baby's age is typically not chronologically started until birth - despite the fact that they're living and existing before then.

 

There are also many cultures that believe the first breath of air is a very significant force for the beginning of "life", for lack of a more appropriate term. This belief may not have as much scientific background as much as cultural and spiritual, but it's very much ingrained in many people.

 

It's also after the actual physical birth of the child that everyone gets to truly meet them for the first time. It's not that they didn't exist before then (especially from the mother's perspective), but not being able to really see them, hold them, and meet them makes the birth a true "beginning" from many standpoints. Something can exist before then, but the real life experience of being truly human doesn't begin until they're out of the womb.

 

The birth process is also a very obvious date and time to count by. Conception/implantation/etc are much more difficult to pinpoint for a lot of women.

 

I know that I do remember the days that I found out I was pregnant. For me, that was truly the moment that everything started. However, I don't count the age of my children based on that day.

 

Is the s or the c silent in scent?

 

 

 

Here's what a google search brings up:

 

late Middle English (denoting the sense of smell): from Old French sentir ‘perceive, smell,’ from Latin sentire . The addition of -c- (in the 17th century) is unexplained.

 

So the c is silent and also shouldn't really be there.

 

 

 

The 'c' was probably added because that was the style at the time.

 

Originally a hunting term. The -c- appeared 17c., perhaps by influence of ascent, descent, etc., or by influence of science. This was a tendency in early Modern English, also in scythe and for a time threatening to make scite and scituate.

 

Is there a certain reason the alphabet has to be in a certain order?

 

The English alphabet comes from the Latin alphabet (it is even often still called the Latin alphabet), which in turn comes from the Greek alphabet. All modern alphabets are most probably in some way descended from the Proto-Sinaitic alphabet, which probably originated around 2100-1800 BC, but whose ordering is unknown. The Greek alphabet developed from Proto-Sinaitic through Phoenician. Many times in between Proto-Sinaitic and English, letters have been added and removed. W, U, and J are among the most recent additions, which did not exist in classical Latin.

 

It is unknown whether the earliest alphabets had a defined sequence. Some alphabets today, such as the Hanuno'o script, are learned one letter at a time, in no particular order, and are not used for collation where a definite order is required. However, a dozen Ugaritic tablets from the fourteenth century BCE preserve the alphabet in two sequences. One, the ABCDE order later used in Phoenician, has continued with minor changes in Hebrew, Greek, Armenian, Gothic, Cyrillic, and Latin; the other, HMĦLQ, was used in southern Arabia and is preserved today in Ethiopic.[16] Both orders have therefore been stable for at least 3000 years.

 

The first letters or proto-letters were taken by the Proto-Sinaitic alphabet from non-alphabetic Egyptian hieroglyphs, which were mostly ideograms, small depictions of objects. Note that these hieroglyphs were used in an entirely different way—the Egyptians didn't use them as alphabetical letters—, so that the order in Egyptian doesn't tell us much about the order in alphabets. Perhaps there was a logical sequence in those earliest forms, but that is unknown; it might very well be an arbitrary order. For all practical purposes, the modern order is best considered random, though fixed.

 

If Cinderella's shoe fit perfectly why did it fall off?

 

It was a slipper, implying that it can *slip* off. And she was running down a hugeass flight of stairs.

 

Is Ke$ha named Ke£ha in England?

 

the name was originated in america, so no

 

What's the definition of definition?

Search Results

def·i·ni·tion

ˌdefəˈniSHən/

noun

noun: definition; plural noun: definitions

1.

a statement of the exact meaning of a word, especially in a dictionary.

 

What does water taste like?

 

water does not have any taste, but, how can you know? the taste of the water changes in glass, and plastic, and carton, and of course, the tap water has a different flavor because it comes all the way from the sky, through the underground tubes, and they may be metal, or plastic, but scientists figure it out when they drunk water in a spaceship, without gravity, the water was floating, without touching anything. hope this is helpful, good luck!

 

If Apple made a car, would it still have windows?

 

Their stores have them, so why not the cars.

 

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If babies are in the womb for 9 months, why aren't they 9 years old when they are born?

 

Sure, technically. In some cultures (like certain Asian cultures), they count the time in the womb with your chronological birth age.

 

When it comes to babies in utero, there is an age of viability (the point at which a fetus can survive outside the womb). Before then, while it may definitely be alive, have a beating heart, and be human, for sure, it cannot survive outside of the mother's body. Since this point of viability is extremely variable depending on other criteria, the baby's age is typically not chronologically started until birth - despite the fact that they're living and existing before then.

 

There are also many cultures that believe the first breath of air is a very significant force for the beginning of "life", for lack of a more appropriate term. This belief may not have as much scientific background as much as cultural and spiritual, but it's very much ingrained in many people.

 

It's also after the actual physical birth of the child that everyone gets to truly meet them for the first time. It's not that they didn't exist before then (especially from the mother's perspective), but not being able to really see them, hold them, and meet them makes the birth a true "beginning" from many standpoints. Something can exist before then, but the real life experience of being truly human doesn't begin until they're out of the womb.

 

The birth process is also a very obvious date and time to count by. Conception/implantation/etc are much more difficult to pinpoint for a lot of women.

 

I know that I do remember the days that I found out I was pregnant. For me, that was truly the moment that everything started. However, I don't count the age of my children based on that day.

 

Is the s or the c silent in scent?

 

 

 

Here's what a google search brings up:

 

late Middle English (denoting the sense of smell): from Old French sentir ‘perceive, smell,’ from Latin sentire . The addition of -c- (in the 17th century) is unexplained.

 

So the c is silent and also shouldn't really be there.

 

 

 

The 'c' was probably added because that was the style at the time.

 

Originally a hunting term. The -c- appeared 17c., perhaps by influence of ascent, descent, etc., or by influence of science. This was a tendency in early Modern English, also in scythe and for a time threatening to make scite and scituate.

 

Is there a certain reason the alphabet has to be in a certain order?

 

The English alphabet comes from the Latin alphabet (it is even often still called the Latin alphabet), which in turn comes from the Greek alphabet. All modern alphabets are most probably in some way descended from the Proto-Sinaitic alphabet, which probably originated around 2100-1800 BC, but whose ordering is unknown. The Greek alphabet developed from Proto-Sinaitic through Phoenician. Many times in between Proto-Sinaitic and English, letters have been added and removed. W, U, and J are among the most recent additions, which did not exist in classical Latin.

 

It is unknown whether the earliest alphabets had a defined sequence. Some alphabets today, such as the Hanuno'o script, are learned one letter at a time, in no particular order, and are not used for collation where a definite order is required. However, a dozen Ugaritic tablets from the fourteenth century BCE preserve the alphabet in two sequences. One, the ABCDE order later used in Phoenician, has continued with minor changes in Hebrew, Greek, Armenian, Gothic, Cyrillic, and Latin; the other, HMĦLQ, was used in southern Arabia and is preserved today in Ethiopic.[16] Both orders have therefore been stable for at least 3000 years.

 

The first letters or proto-letters were taken by the Proto-Sinaitic alphabet from non-alphabetic Egyptian hieroglyphs, which were mostly ideograms, small depictions of objects. Note that these hieroglyphs were used in an entirely different way—the Egyptians didn't use them as alphabetical letters—, so that the order in Egyptian doesn't tell us much about the order in alphabets. Perhaps there was a logical sequence in those earliest forms, but that is unknown; it might very well be an arbitrary order. For all practical purposes, the modern order is best considered random, though fixed.

 

If Cinderella's shoe fit perfectly why did it fall off?

 

It was a slipper, implying that it can *slip* off. And she was running down a hugeass flight of stairs.

 

Is Ke$ha named Ke£ha in England?

 

the name was originated in america, so no

 

What's the definition of definition?

Search Results

def·i·ni·tion

ˌdefəˈniSHən/

noun

noun: definition; plural noun: definitions

1.

a statement of the exact meaning of a word, especially in a dictionary.

 

What does water taste like?

 

water does not have any taste, but, how can you know? the taste of the water changes in glass, and plastic, and carton, and of course, the tap water has a different flavor because it comes all the way from the sky, through the underground tubes, and they may be metal, or plastic, but scientists figure it out when they drunk water in a spaceship, without gravity, the water was floating, without touching anything. hope this is helpful, good luck!

 

If Apple made a car, would it still have windows?

 

Their stores have them, so why not the cars.

 

tumblr_ls38uvIAAf1qii6tmo1_250.gif

 

i can post more questions if you guys want

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Share on other sites

If babies are in the womb for 9 months, why aren't they 9 years old when they are born?

 

Is the s or the c silent in scent?

 

Is there a certain reason the alphabet has to be in a certain order?

 

If Cinderella's shoe fit perfectly why did it fall off?

Is Ke$ha named Ke£ha in England?

What's the definition of definition?

What does water taste like?

 

If Apple made a car, would it still have windows?

You make my day :har: :har: :har:

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

If babies are in the womb for 9 months, why aren't they 9 years old when they are born?

 

Sure, technically. In some cultures (like certain Asian cultures), they count the time in the womb with your chronological birth age.

 

When it comes to babies in utero, there is an age of viability (the point at which a fetus can survive outside the womb). Before then, while it may definitely be alive, have a beating heart, and be human, for sure, it cannot survive outside of the mother's body. Since this point of viability is extremely variable depending on other criteria, the baby's age is typically not chronologically started until birth - despite the fact that they're living and existing before then.

 

There are also many cultures that believe the first breath of air is a very significant force for the beginning of "life", for lack of a more appropriate term. This belief may not have as much scientific background as much as cultural and spiritual, but it's very much ingrained in many people.

 

It's also after the actual physical birth of the child that everyone gets to truly meet them for the first time. It's not that they didn't exist before then (especially from the mother's perspective), but not being able to really see them, hold them, and meet them makes the birth a true "beginning" from many standpoints. Something can exist before then, but the real life experience of being truly human doesn't begin until they're out of the womb.

 

The birth process is also a very obvious date and time to count by. Conception/implantation/etc are much more difficult to pinpoint for a lot of women.

 

I know that I do remember the days that I found out I was pregnant. For me, that was truly the moment that everything started. However, I don't count the age of my children based on that day.

 

Is the s or the c silent in scent?

 

 

 

Here's what a google search brings up:

 

late Middle English (denoting the sense of smell): from Old French sentir ‘perceive, smell,’ from Latin sentire . The addition of -c- (in the 17th century) is unexplained.

 

So the c is silent and also shouldn't really be there.

 

 

 

The 'c' was probably added because that was the style at the time.

 

Originally a hunting term. The -c- appeared 17c., perhaps by influence of ascent, descent, etc., or by influence of science. This was a tendency in early Modern English, also in scythe and for a time threatening to make scite and scituate.

 

Is there a certain reason the alphabet has to be in a certain order?

 

The English alphabet comes from the Latin alphabet (it is even often still called the Latin alphabet), which in turn comes from the Greek alphabet. All modern alphabets are most probably in some way descended from the Proto-Sinaitic alphabet, which probably originated around 2100-1800 BC, but whose ordering is unknown. The Greek alphabet developed from Proto-Sinaitic through Phoenician. Many times in between Proto-Sinaitic and English, letters have been added and removed. W, U, and J are among the most recent additions, which did not exist in classical Latin.

 

It is unknown whether the earliest alphabets had a defined sequence. Some alphabets today, such as the Hanuno'o script, are learned one letter at a time, in no particular order, and are not used for collation where a definite order is required. However, a dozen Ugaritic tablets from the fourteenth century BCE preserve the alphabet in two sequences. One, the ABCDE order later used in Phoenician, has continued with minor changes in Hebrew, Greek, Armenian, Gothic, Cyrillic, and Latin; the other, HMĦLQ, was used in southern Arabia and is preserved today in Ethiopic.[16] Both orders have therefore been stable for at least 3000 years.

 

The first letters or proto-letters were taken by the Proto-Sinaitic alphabet from non-alphabetic Egyptian hieroglyphs, which were mostly ideograms, small depictions of objects. Note that these hieroglyphs were used in an entirely different way—the Egyptians didn't use them as alphabetical letters—, so that the order in Egyptian doesn't tell us much about the order in alphabets. Perhaps there was a logical sequence in those earliest forms, but that is unknown; it might very well be an arbitrary order. For all practical purposes, the modern order is best considered random, though fixed.

 

If Cinderella's shoe fit perfectly why did it fall off?

 

It was a slipper, implying that it can *slip* off. And she was running down a hugeass flight of stairs.

 

Is Ke$ha named Ke£ha in England?

 

the name was originated in america, so no

 

What's the definition of definition?

Search Results

def·i·ni·tion

ˌdefəˈniSHən/

noun

noun: definition; plural noun: definitions

1.

a statement of the exact meaning of a word, especially in a dictionary.

 

What does water taste like?

 

water does not have any taste, but, how can you know? the taste of the water changes in glass, and plastic, and carton, and of course, the tap water has a different flavor because it comes all the way from the sky, through the underground tubes, and they may be metal, or plastic, but scientists figure it out when they drunk water in a spaceship, without gravity, the water was floating, without touching anything. hope this is helpful, good luck!

 

If Apple made a car, would it still have windows?

 

Their stores have them, so why not the cars.

 

I thought s/he's joking :derp:

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