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Queen's Mine

Chopsticks Culture, China vs Japan vs Korea

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chopsticks.jpg

Japanese chopsticks [top]

Korean chopsticks

Chinese chopsticks [bottom]

 

Chopsticks have long been a curio to many a western eye. In ancient China, up to 5,000 years ago, sticks or branches broken from trees would be used to retrieve food from fires and thus saw the very beginnings of the development of what became chopsticks in China.

 

As populations grew and resources became more scarce, people would cut food into ever smaller pieces to save on fuel, as food made in this way could be cooked quickly. Within a century the humble chopsticks had migrated to other Asian countries, such as Japan, Korea and Vietnam. Although, originally, the Japanese would only use chopsticks in certain religious ceremonies, they quickly gained popularity as everyday items.

 

To the casual observer all chopsticks might just look the same; particularly regarding the fact that many Japanese and Korean restaurants overseas (that may not even employ staff from those countries) often generically use Chinese-style chopsticks.

 

Chinese chopsticks (kuàizi ç­·å­) can be made from a variety of materials:bamboo, plastic, wood, bone, metal, or sometimes even jade, ivory or silver. Kuaizi are around 25 cm long, rectangular in shape, with blunt ends.

 

Japanese chopsticks (hashi 箸 or otemoto ãŠã¦ã‚‚ã¨) are slightly shorter than Chinese, they are typically rounded and taper to a point. This may be attributed to the fact that the Japanese diet consists of large amounts of whole bony fish. The pointed ends make it easier to remove small bones from the fish.

 

Korean chopsticks (jeotgarak ì “ê°€ë½) are of medium-length with a small, flat rectangular shape, and made of metal. Traditionally they were made of brass or silver. Many Korean metal chopsticks are ornately decorated at the grip. They are virtually always used in tandem with a spoon

 

When comparing these three main chopsticks many people may find themselves trying to decide which ones are better, but each type of chopsticks has their advantages and flaws. For example Korean chopsticks are much heavier than Chinese or Japanese because they are made of metal only, but because of this they are often believed to be the most hygienically clean. Japanese chopsticks are shorter than Chinese or Korean, and this it makes them more comfortable for picking up small pieces of food, like rice or beans.

 

Other East Asian countries like Vietnam, Laos or Thailand use chopsticks as well, but generally speaking their chopsticks are very similar to Chinese chopsticks.

 

chopsticks-master.jpg

 

Source:http://www.theworldofchinese.com/2014/02/different-chopsticks-explained/

 

 

 

Chopsticks Etiquette

 

chopsticks-etiquette.jpg?t=1429193634

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I remember when I was in Seoul last summer, I had to refrain from bringing the bowl closer to my mouth and using chopsticks to shove food into my mouth. I'm Vietnamese and I assume it's fine to do that in my own culture since I've seen my late dad and other family members do it dozens of times when I was a kid, and I've also done it myself, but I was aware that it was considered poor etiquette in Korea. 

 

Korean and Japanese chopsticks are the easiest for me to use. Chinese-style chopsticks are the most difficult for me, despite them being prevalently used in Vietnamese culture. 

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I'm pretty good with both Japanese and Chinese chopsticks as long as they are wooden. I do prefer longer chopsticks though.

 

Eating with metal chopsticks is a torture.  :cry:

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Korean chopsticks are so heavy and hard to use  :rlytearpls: THE FOOD SLIP SO EASILY FROM THE CHOPSTICK

When I eat in Korean places and they provide metal chopsticks, my hands get tired easily whenever I use them LMAO

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I remember when I was in Seoul last summer, I had to refrain from bringing the bowl closer to my mouth and using chopsticks to shove food into my mouth. I'm Vietnamese and I assume it's fine to do that in my own culture since I've seen my late dad and other family members do it dozens of times when I was a kid, and I've also done it myself, but I was aware that it was considered poor etiquette in Korea.

 

Korean and Japanese chopsticks are the easiest for me to use. Chinese-style chopsticks are the most difficult for me, despite them being prevalently used in Vietnamese culture.

Lol for me korean chopsticks is the hardest because is to thin also slippery, both Japanese chopsticks and Chinese chopsticks work fine with me but I prefer the long one.

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Chinese >> Japanese>>>>Korean chopsticks

 

Korean chopsticks HURT. Japanese chopsticks are really light (and their designs are pretty). I like Chinese ones for their length since I hold mine pretty high up.

 

Most Viet people use Chinese chopsticks.

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not any of those nationalities but I use both japan's and china's without all the etiquette and it's easier to use depending on what food you're eating. china chopstick are easier to use on non sticky rice.

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I'm Viet and I've used various kinds of chopsticks from Vietnamese to Chinese to Japanese to Korean, and I prefer Japanese and Korean chopsticks. I don't like Chinese/Vietnamese chopsticks since the ends are so wide and thick. I need the ends to be narrow for me to pick up food easily. 

 

Also, I keep hearing/seeing people say that metal chopsticks are heavy but I don't feel any difference between them and any other chopsticks I've used?? 

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I use all three and like them all

 

I think the "not picking utensils before your elder" is applicable to China as well because Zhang Yuan schooled that to his foreign friends on "where are my friend home"

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not any of those nationalities but I use both japan's and china's without all the etiquette and it's easier to use depending on what food you're eating. china chopstick are easier to use on non sticky rice.

 

Personally i find Chinese chopsticks the most difficult to use on non-sticky rice. I cannot for the life of me pick up non-sticky rice with Chinese chopsticks at all because of the blunt ends, whereas I can with Japanese and Korean chopsticks since they have pointed ends. 

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To be honest, most of the etiquette inter-cross between the three, especially for things like sticking your chopsticks vertically into the rice because that looks like incense at funerals.

 

I used to hold my chopsticks criss-crossing as a kid LOL. It took me a few years before I started holding it correctly, and that definitely made the chopsticks easier to use as well.

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Using Korean chopsticks is torturous. I was once invited to lunch at my friend's house, and struggled not to make a fool of myself in front of them during the meal.

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Korean=Japanese > Chinese chopsticks. The narrower/pointier the tip, the easier it is to use. 

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Japanese chopsticks are so difficult for me to use.The first time I went to a sushi restaurant, I struggled with it so much. Korean and Chinese ones are easier for me, but I prefer the Chinese ones for their length

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I love japanese chopsticks . I find korean ones kinda uncomfortable even tho I like the shape ( not so much the material, HEAVY! )

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I've used Korean chopsticks all my life and find Chinese chopsticks the most difficult to use due to their length. The length+lightness changes the balance that I'm used to and sometimes I overestimate strength/underestimate space. However, all chopsticks are easy to use imo.

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I'm biased but I prefer Japanese chopsticks. I've never noticed any issue in using Korean chopsticks but I'll still use Japanese chopsticks when I'm at home.

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