Jump to content
Forums Rules Staff Themes Leaderboard Quick Links Clubs Awards Member Shop OH! Press

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Amberiel

Lack of community/unity among J-pop fans?

Recommended Posts

Please excuse this wall of text.

 

I was thinking, but J-pop fans are really passive. We always talk about artists should do more to reach out internationally but how many of us actually try to reach out to them? On the other hand visual-kei and K-pop fans are more go-getters. Sometime ago I was talking to a friend in the industry. They told me that not all acts are aware of the fact that they have international fans or how big that base is. Also that it's risky to send them overseas if they don't have a solid fanbase, or the act may be expensive (equipment, staff, etc). So it's like why put money into the the unknown when I have this safe and secure way of doing things. Especially since Japan's economy isn't the best right now.

 

I'll give some examples based on experience or what I've seen. When I was but a wee, little K-pop fan back in '07, I used to go on fan forums a lot. Fans would pool together money to give gifts to idols, they'd do fan meet-ups and write them letters. I think that was fundamental in companies in Korea taking interest in international fans. Now in comparison, there are little J-pop fandoms that are as organized, AKB fans and H!P fans come to mind. Around '09/10 when Twitter was getting popular, fans would try to get various groups to trend globally and just about every week as a K-pop releated trending topic. But with J-pop I've only known it to happen twice, one for Yamapi  (#deadfisheyes) and Akanishi Jin (#eggplant).

 

My friends and I joke about #JpopFanStruggles, but when I get down to it, I don't actively show that I'm a fan? t, I don't comment on any of my favorite artists' youtube videos, go out of my way to tweet them or send fan letters. But at the same time, I still want/expect for them to cater to my wants and needs as an international fan.

 

Another side to the coin is that elitism within J-pop fandom has turned potential fans away? For example on old Arama, when K-pop was getting popular in Japan, there were those who showed their ugly-side and xenophobia was frequent. I know a couple of friends who were turned off (they were getting into some acts from seeing them interact with their idols). Even myself, I've felt discouraged from liking certain acts based on their legitimacy as an act. Which I think could either push potential fans away or cause them to just enjoy their faves in private. Thus not actively taking part in the community.

 

Some questions to get the discussion rolling

Do you think that it is possible that an established J-pop community can become a thing?

Do you think that the lack of fans trying to reach out to agencies/labels are why certain acts don't activities outside of Japan?

Do you think certain mentalities among J-pop fans have turned away potential fans?

Why do you think J-pop fans are passive?

If you could get one of your favorite Japanese artist to realise they do have an international fanbase, how would you go about doing so?

Do you believe that agencies and labels should get over their fear of risks and put their acts out there irregardless of the size of their international fanbase?
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Idk...majority of kpop fans are into idol portion of kpop while alot in jpop we got people that like stuffs other than idols so it's kinda hard to be unify

 

Also the lack of english materials make it hard for fans to be active stan sometimes so that's why fans are more passive. It gotten better these yrs tho but it's not the same level as kpop either and you to have to dig for stuffs...which turn off people bc they're lazy....you tend to find more organize fandom with idol groups like 48G, JE etc more bc they're actively subbing stuffs that help keep fans interest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think its doing fine/better now.Many Jpop singers/groups actually are getting to kno they have many overseas fansthru twitter, instagram, reaction videos/youtube. I actuallly even got responses back on my twitter from 2 to 3 Jpop groups/singers. Jpop singers are doing more world tours which is very nice!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you think that it is possible that an established J-pop community can become a thing?
 

If you mean "established" like in the way K-Pop communities are, then no, I don't think so. There's so many genres that it's difficult to get everyone so excited and passionate about one thing. We've got a pretty nice community here on OH, and something like this is as close as you're going to get, I think. I would like to see it grow a bit, though. Bring in more people who like more genres. If those 2014 NHK results are any indication, there's a lot of diversity in taste out there.

Do you think that the lack of fans trying to reach out to agencies/labels are why certain acts don't activities outside of Japan?

 

If there isn't a strong enough demand for your act to come somewhere, then as a company, why would you risk spending that money and time? At the same time, they need to put something out there in order to promote these acts, even if it's just putting (mostly) full music videos up on YouTube or translating some of their information into English. There's been more and more of that in recent years, but everyone needs to start doing it if they want to garner a little interest.

Do you think certain mentalities among J-pop fans have turned away potential fans?

Possibly. There's a bit of elitism that runs through communities, and sometimes they can be pretty closed off when it comes to information and such. Though I think part of that comes from wanting to protect some of their work, whether it's subbed shows and videos or whatever (because Japanese companies are so determined to take that stuff down). 

Why do you think J-pop fans are passive?

 

I think there's less of a "fanboy"/"fangirl" thing going on with J-Pop fans because most are older now. For most J-Pop fans, it's just music. Something enjoyable to listen to and discuss in their free time. There isn't that strong desire there to make their acts #1 at everything, get them on every TV show, or have a strong, connected fanbase like there is with K-Pop fans. 

 

If you could get one of your favorite Japanese artist to realise they do have an international fanbase, how would you go about doing so?

 

Buy their music. Follow them on their social media accounts. If I want something from them, ask questions. You'd be surprised at how many Japanese companies/artists are willing to answer questions from international fans, even if they can't give them what they want.

Do you believe that agencies and labels should get over their fear of risks and put their acts out there irregardless of the size of their international fanbase?

 

I don't think labels should be forced to put their acts out there, but I believe they should loosen up a little bit. They don't have to immediately go out and tour in seven different countries or something, but as I said before, put things out in English. Put some videos up on Youtube. Open social media accounts and talk to all your fans, not just the Japanese ones. Small steps like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you think that it is possible that an established J-pop community can become a thing?


 


This implies that there is a reason that we are not unified.  That reason (obviously) has not been dealt with yet so until then, no.


I also think it is kind of funny that people expect us to be more unified when japan's soft power in cultural exports have been declining a lot for a while now


 


Do you think that the lack of fans trying to reach out to agencies/labels are why certain acts don't activities outside of Japan?


 


Of course it's the reason. How do they know that you want to give them your money when you make no effort to tell them that you want to give them money.  And i don't think cdjapan or amazon would inform the company of the demographics information of who buys their stuff.


Also, not much agencies/firms here are willing to sponsor japanese cultural products to bring it over here.  it's a two-way street.


 


Do you think certain mentalities among J-pop fans have turned away potential fans?


 


Yes, heck, even i don't have that much fun posting here.


 


Why do you think J-pop fans are passive?


 


Because the only people still in it are older people who have lives and can't dedicate their income/time to their faves.


They also expect japan to cater to them directly because otherwise, it is just very mendokusai.


 


If you could get one of your favorite Japanese artist to realise they do have an international fanbase, how would you go about doing so?


 


internet trends and letters.  Spread the news.  Translate more things.  Do anything that shows interest.


 


Do you believe that agencies and labels should get over their fear of risks and put their acts out there irregardless of the size of their international fanbase?


 


While they could gain a lot from risks, they can also face utter financial devastation.  In a terrible economy like Japan's, it is better to tread cautiously.  Of course, some things are a bit unreasonable and can be loosened without losing much in terms of money.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you think that it is possible that an established J-pop community can become a thing?

 

MAYBE. Among the idols and soloists (only certain ones), yes. However, I can only see this happening with the younger fans (teenagers) and maybe young adults (early 20s). However, a lot of Jpop fans are older, and just simply don't have the time or want to establish the community that Kpop fans have.

 

Do you think that the lack of fans trying to reach out to agencies/labels are why certain acts don't activities outside of Japan?

 

I actually think you're on to something. And this could be one of the main reasons why. I remember all those fan projects in Kpop...and I definitely think this was a huge factor in helping Kpop expand.

 

Do you think certain mentalities among J-pop fans have turned away potential fans?

 

Maybe.

 

Why do you think J-pop fans are passive?

 

Cuz a lot of us are older, and we are used to the disappointment of copyright issues and lack of eng subs lol

 

If you could get one of your favorite Japanese artist to realise they do have an international fanbase, how would you go about doing so?

 

Twitter? tbh I don't really care.. 

 

Do you believe that agencies and labels should get over their fear of risks and put their acts out there irregardless of the size of their international fanbase?

 

I don't think labels should be forced to put their acts out there, but I believe they should loosen up a little bit. They don't have to immediately go out and tour in seven different countries or something, but as I said before, put things out in English. Put some videos up on Youtube. Open social media accounts and talk to all your fans, not just the Japanese ones. Small steps like that.

 

Mandi's comment sums it up nicely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Things are far more accessible today than ever, it'll only keep getting better.

 

+ J-Music scene is very big,

Let's take the most popular medium outlet... Anime

Even anime alone, we're talking 100+ OP/ED/Insert and OSTs... So already over 200 singles for OP/ED a year and depending on the insert song, could go up to 300 or more. 

 

And that's only counting TV series, and not movie/OVA/special/oneshots.

 

For them to even notice and want to promote overseas, they need to see "very considerable" interest, and that is difficult.

After all, we're talking about a very established, 2+ billion dollar J-music industry as oppose to a 250 million K-music industry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you think that it is possible that an established J-pop community can become a thing?

 

Mmm, I really don't know... I know that you can establish ones for certain acts, AHS and Stage46 are testaments to this. But one that is for all of Japanese music fandom? I don't think so. There's too much to cover. It would be like making one for all of American music, where Fifth Harmony fans and How To Dress Well fans and Metallica fans all get together. This isn't like the KPop fandom where everyone is focused on 1 type of act: idols.

 

 

Do you think that the lack of fans trying to reach out to agencies/labels are why certain acts don't activities outside of Japan?

 

I think this could be part of it. Like how do fans make themselves known? But then again, what are Japanese acts doing to make themselves known overseas? I do see some making inroads though. It seems as if the number of concerts overseas, subbed videos, translated news, and international fan clubs has increased.

 

 

Do you think certain mentalities among J-pop fans have turned away potential fans?

 

Yes. There are so many things... The closed off communities like JPS and those LJ pages. The people who brag about sales. The weeaboo stigma.

 

 

Why do you think J-pop fans are passive?

 

Because a lot are older and don't have the time. And also because a lot of us are used to how things are now. We have our ways to work around the system and we're fine with that. We've kinda been beaten into submission.

 

If you could get one of your favorite Japanese artist to realise they do have an international fanbase, how would you go about doing so?

 

Good question. Social media is a good way, but then again you're just one voice in a crowd speaking to them. Maybe tweeting in English would help since it would stand out from all the Japanese. I actually have interacted with some acts via Twitter. I even talked to one of my favorites: Taku of m-flo. He was engaging with a lot of international fans around the time the whole "Fuck JPop!" thing happened. But one thing about all of the ones I talked to is that they can speak English. The access was easier there. But I will say that something Ryu and I have noticed is that some of our Arama articles are seen by the acts we're writing about. They'll retweet them, so they know that they do have some international attention. But these are mostly smaller acts who are looking for attention anywhere. We've thought of maybe reaching out to these acts for interviews. I think one thing we could do on Arama is perhaps tweet articles to the acts as a means of getting their attention. Again, I think the fact that it is in English would make it stand out.

 

 

Do you believe that agencies and labels should get over their fear of risks and put their acts out there irregardless of the size of their international fanbase?

 

I think it could be a good thing, but then again with the way the economy is, I don't know if they would.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The international fanbase is so fragmented across genres, though. I mean what kind of organization would be lucrative enough for a label to take notice? And for which artist? Soloists, groups, idols, bands?

 

 

The ways to be "involved" are too scattered, too. This past Saturday was 48G's senbatsu sousenkyo. A Namie Amuro diehard is not going to buy a CD for election ticket.

 

 

I also think after the anime boom you have the issue of getting international audiences to consider JPop acts as more than those people who do anime OP/EDs. With the cultural and laungauge barriers, what would the record companies be willing to do to overcome this? JPop style doesn't always have that ease of Western acceasibility that KPop has.

 

Finally, Westerners don't have a wota analog. A wota will be willing to buy incredible amounts of closely associated products to support an artist. As a result, record companies & jimusho cater events & merchandise to this sector of their consumer base. It just doesn't look attractive for a label to scale this HUGE wall of language/culture in exchange for a handful of international fans who aren't going to buy more than an iTunes download or two, if they give the artist in question a chance at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Basically we, Japanese music scene fans, aren't as united as Kpop fans because it's due to being more older, understanding (most of us), and we don't worship the artists/idols, we follow them.

 

Just my take.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you think that it is possible that an established J-pop community can become a thing?


If by J-pop you mean J-pop and not J-urban+J-rock+J-indie+J-idol+etc. then it is possible. The main problem, as others have pointed out, is fans of the Japanese music industry have too diverse tastes so the community as a whole it too divided. 


 


Do you think that the lack of fans trying to reach out to agencies/labels are why certain acts don't activities outside of Japan?


Not entirely, I think it mostly stems from the fact that most acts that would have a sizeable fandom outside of Japan don't need to actively promote internationally to make money.


 


Do you think certain mentalities among J-pop fans have turned away potential fans?


Yes, particularly the need to over analyse every bit of music that comes out/ the hostility within the J-music community/ the elitism that many non-idol fans have/ the elitism that idol fans have over sale/ the inability of some fans to differentiate between opinion and fact in terms of discussing quality/ etc.


 


Why do you think J-pop fans are passive?


Its not that J-pop fans are overly passive, its just that k-pop fans tend go over board. K-pop is marketed toward middle school- college aged fans so this is expected. Look at what most of the comments from k-pop stans are "oppa did this" "blah blah airport fashion" "slay queens/kings", most of the time its less about anything to do with what they produce and more to do with fuelling hero worship.


 


If you could get one of your favorite Japanese artist to realise they do have an international fanbase, how would you go about doing so?


I wouldn't know of a definite way of doing this since the main goal is to get noticed by the artists there isn't one answer but, something that 20-30ish ( maybe more or less, I didn't count) members of the H!P fandom has done to try to get C-ute to go to South America is collectively make a video asking them to. It wasn't so much what they were saying in the video and more of the number of people who were part of the video.


 

 


 


Do you believe that agencies and labels should get over their fear of risks and put their acts out there irregardless of the size of their international fanbase?


If they want to focus on growing their international fanbase yes, if they don't care then no. The problem here is that most companies tend to be in the latter.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Do you think that it is possible that an established J-pop community can become a thing?

If by J-pop you mean J-pop and not J-urban+J-rock+J-indie+J-idol+etc. then it is possible. The main problem, as others have pointed out, is fans of the Japanese music industry have too diverse tastes so the community as a whole it too divided. 

 

Do you think that the lack of fans trying to reach out to agencies/labels are why certain acts don't activities outside of Japan?

Not entirely, I think it mostly stems from the fact that most acts that would have a sizeable fandom outside of Japan don't need to actively promote internationally to make money.

 

Do you think certain mentalities among J-pop fans have turned away potential fans?

Yes, particularly the need to over analyse every bit of music that comes out/ the hostility within the J-music community/ the elitism that many non-idol fans have/ the elitism that idol fans have over sale/ the inability of some fans to differentiate between opinion and fact in terms of discussing quality/ etc.

 

Why do you think J-pop fans are passive?

Its not that J-pop fans are overly passive, its just that k-pop fans tend go over board. K-pop is marketed toward middle school- college aged fans so this is expected. Look at what most of the comments from k-pop stans are "oppa did this" "blah blah airport fashion" "slay queens/kings", most of the time its less about anything to do with what they produce and more to do with fuelling hero worship.

 

If you could get one of your favorite Japanese artist to realise they do have an international fanbase, how would you go about doing so?

I wouldn't know of a definite way of doing this since the main goal is to get noticed by the artists their isn't one answer but, something that 20-30ish ( maybe more or less, I didn't count) members of the H!P fandom has done to try to get C-ute to go to South America is collectively make a video asking them to. It wasn't so much what they were saying in the video and more of the number of people who were part of the video.

 

 

 

Do you believe that agencies and labels should get over their fear of risks and put their acts out there irregardless of the size of their international fanbase?

If they want to focus on growing their international fanbase yes, if they don't care then no. The problem here is the most companies tend to be in the latter.

 

 

If you got just JPop, like how you describe it, who would that even be?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you got just JPop, like how you describe it, who would that even be?

E-girls, Namie, Perfume, and Kana to name a few, when I think of pop from any country I think of music made specifically to be popular in the mainstream and not amongst an artists fandom or the fanbase of a particular genre. Pop music can have aspects of other genres but a lot of the time its a more public friendly version. Ex// Taylor Swift's old music--> pop-Country, Kyary Pamyu Pamyu --> pop-Idol.

 

Also what I meant by "not J-urban+J-rock+J-indie+J-idol+etc." I was talking about the collective of the different genres because I don't think they can develop a like minded fandom since a lot the time the only connection is the language.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

E-girls, Namie, Perfume, and Kana to name a few, when I think of pop from any country I think of music made specifically to be popular in the mainstream and not amongst an artists fandom or the fanbase of a particular genre. Pop music can have aspects of other genres but a lot of the time its a more public friendly version. Ex// Taylor Swift's old music--> pop-Country, Kyary Pamyu Pamyu --> pop-Idol.

 

Also what I meant by "not J-urban+J-rock+J-indie+J-idol+etc." I was talking about the collective of the different genres because I don't think they can develop a like minded fandom since a lot the time the only connection is the language.

 

The thing is though is that that JPop you speak of is quite small. Some would lump E-girls and Perfume in with the J-idols. You're pretty much left talking about a select number of female soloists, few of which do much anymore. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing is though is that that JPop you speak of is quite small. Some would lump E-girls and Perfume in with the J-idols. You're pretty much left talking about a select number of female soloists, few of which do much anymore. 

Small doesn't mean they can't develop a large international fandom if they really tried. Look at kpop for example. Most (not all) fans are brought in by YG and SM then later either stay in those fanbases or move to other groups. It might be a little different now because kpop has become more popular, but I'm going to guess that's how most pre-2012 kpop fans found it. And in E-girls' and Perfume's case I would put them in the same group as Kyary as pop-idols and all three have growing international fanbases so it shows that the groups of artist don't need to be big for j-pop fandoms to grow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Small doesn't mean they can't develop a large international fandom if they really tried. Look at kpop for example. Most (not all) fans are brought in by YG and SM then later either stay in those fanbases or move to other groups. It might be a little different now because kpop has become more popular, but I'm going to guess that's how most pre-2012 kpop fans found it. And in E-girls' and Perfume's case I would put them in the same group as Kyary as pop-idols and all three have growing international fanbases so it shows that the groups of artist don't need to be big for j-pop fandoms to grow.

 

Ehh, there are several differences between this group you're suggesting and YG and SM. For one, it's Namie and Kana, along with some people like Ayu and Kuu. Ayu and Kuu are kinda winding down their careers. They don't really do much anymore. Namie is in the same boat kinda but she's still successful. The only one who is success and still doing a lot is Kana. With SM and YG, you have Big Bang (plus their soloists and sub-units), 2NE1 (plus their soloists and subunits), DBSK, Super Junior (and their subunits), SNSD (and their subunit), Shinee, and f(x). There are a lot more acts here. And they all were at their peak or just starting out, so there was a lot more activity. You would need like 10 Kanas to equal this. We had that like a decade ago, but not today.

 

E-girls (along with the rest of LDH), Perfume, and Kyary are all kinda in that no man's land between artists and idols. I could definitely see this segment growing internationally. But what makes this different from KPop is that there aren't more than them. They really are it basically for that style of act.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ehh, there are several differences between this group you're suggesting and YG and SM. For one, it's Namie and Kana, along with some people like Ayu and Kuu. Ayu and Kuu are kinda winding down their careers. They don't really do much anymore. Namie is in the same boat kinda but she's still successful. The only one who is success and still doing a lot is Kana. With SM and YG, you have Big Bang (plus their soloists and sub-units), 2NE1 (plus their soloists and subunits), DBSK, Super Junior (and their subunits), SNSD (and their subunit), Shinee, and f(x). There are a lot more acts here. And they all were at their peak or just starting out, so there was a lot more activity. You would need like 10 Kanas to equal this. We had that like a decade ago, but not today.

 

E-girls (along with the rest of LDH), Perfume, and Kyary are all kinda in that no man's land between artists and idols. I could definitely see this segment growing internationally. But what makes this different from KPop is that there aren't more than them. They really are it basically for that style of act.

 

For numbers you seem to gloss over LDH. E-girls has their groups that make up E-girls and now their starting on the solos debuts, Exile also has its solos and subgroups, etc. Perfume and Kyary seem to be doing fine gaining fans.

 

Anyway, its because of the fact that this group is different from YG and SM that they could be able gain international fans more with fewer acts. YG and SM were able to grow in popular because at the time there wasn't sizeable competition like is today so they were able to produce a ton of groups that were lacking in some aspects but other groups made up for those. Now they have the company power and so much fandom loyalty that it doesn't really matter if new group are lacking somewhere. Jpop acts don't have this luxury, or at least not to this extent, because Jpop hasn't been aggressively promoting the way Kpop has; therefore, the groups/soloists had to either become stronger all around or have something about them that sets them apart from the rest. This makes it easier for fewer acts to gain more fans since they don't have the same problems that they groups that developed the kpop industry to what it is today had.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For numbers you seem to gloss over LDH. E-girls has their groups that make up E-girls and now their starting on the solos debuts, Exile also has its solos and subgroups, etc. Perfume and Kyary seem to be doing fine gaining fans.

 

Anyway, its because of the fact that this group is different from YG and SM that they could be able gain international fans more with fewer acts. YG and SM were able to grow in popular because at the time there wasn't sizeable competition like is today so they were able to produce a ton of groups that were lacking in some aspects but other groups made up for those. Now they have the company power and so much fandom loyalty that it doesn't really matter if new group are lacking somewhere. Jpop acts don't have this luxury, or at least not to this extent, because Jpop hasn't been aggressively promoting the way Kpop has; therefore, the groups/soloists had to either become stronger all around or have something about them that sets them apart from the rest. This makes it easier for fewer acts to gain more fans since they don't have the same problems that they groups that developed the kpop industry to what it is today had.

 

When I was talking about numbers, I was talking about the first group of acts you mentioned, the ones that wouldn't be deemed as idols.

 

Why group are you talking about in the second paragraph?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was talking about numbers, I was talking about the first group of acts you mentioned, the ones that wouldn't be deemed as idols.

 

Why group are you talking about in the second paragraph?

I was talking about that no mans land between idols and artists that you mentioned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One reason is how Japan treats international fans vs how Korea treats them. Japan puts everything under lock and key, they don't upload full MVs, they make it hard for international fans to buy concert tickets, they make competitions Japan-only etc. Meanwhile Korea is a lot more inclusive, things like letting us vote on music shows, global ticket packages set up by record labels, or just having their websites in friggin English, says to me they want our participation.

 

When I was into J-pop, I was also one of those fans who quietly just enjoyed the music and didn't get too involved in the community (was there even a community?).

With K-pop, there's so much drama all the time (instigated no doubt by music shows pitting groups against each other) so it's almost impossible not to get involved. The whole system is quite brilliant: because things like buying albums, streaming, voting, etc count towards award shows, and people obviously want their fav artists to win, fans get more pro-active than they otherwise might. And when you've already invested so much time and money, you also get protective of artists you support, and, shall we say, "passionate discussions" arise. This is at least one factor that I believe contributes to the quite lively community.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't understand a lot of kpop fans who claim to be huge Jpop fans but because of the lack of access to materials that they decided to switch to Kpop. What kind of excuses is that? Why can't they just admit that they find Kpop more interesting instead?

 

In recent years we have youtube, fast internet, torrent and a lot of file sharing platforms, there are more online stores shipping merchandises oversea. Back in the day, from where I live, I could never imagine I would be able to possess  an authentic Jpop CD, the internet was slow, there was a lot of spamming, there wasn't any fan subs, etc. Then there came livejournal era where you obtain the music illegally lol. Unable to access to jpop isn't the reason that Jpop doesn't appeal to international fans. It's more about different taste. That's why I don't really want to try to introduce Jpop to people I know. I do recommend songs, but if they don't seem to like it, then I will just let it pass. 

 

I've not joined any Jpop fan community for about 5 years until I find this forum. That doesn't make me less interested in Jpop either. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The funny thing is that I've seen a lot of new names since this thread started...

 

One reason is how Japan treats international fans vs how Korea treats them. Japan puts everything under lock and key, they don't upload full MVs, they make it hard for international fans to buy concert tickets, they make competitions Japan-only etc. Meanwhile Korea is a lot more inclusive, things like letting us vote on music shows, global ticket packages set up by record labels, or just having their websites in friggin English, says to me they want our participation.

 

When I was into J-pop, I was also one of those fans who quietly just enjoyed the music and didn't get too involved in the community (was there even a community?).

With K-pop, there's so much drama all the time (instigated no doubt by music shows pitting groups against each other) so it's almost impossible not to get involved. The whole system is quite brilliant: because things like buying albums, streaming, voting, etc count towards award shows, and people obviously want their fav artists to win, fans get more pro-active than they otherwise might. And when you've already invested so much time and money, you also get protective of artists you support, and, shall we say, "passionate discussions" arise. This is at least one factor that I believe contributes to the quite lively community.

 

Japan isn't trying while Korea is though. There are totally different things at play here.

 

There are full videos in many places, just no YouTube.

 

There was much more of a community a decade ago compared to now. I've always been part of a community since I've been a fan, and the numbers have decreased. But I do see them growing now. Or maybe people are just joining together now?

 

But those things are non-music related though. The question is: are you here for drama or for the music? I see so many on people on the KPop side say that they don't care about KPop anymore and that they just want to see drama.

 

 

I can't understand a lot of kpop fans who claim to be huge Jpop fans but because of the lack of access to materials that they decided to switch to Kpop. What kind of excuses is that? Why can't they just admit that they find Kpop more interesting instead?

 

In recent years we have youtube, fast internet, torrent and a lot of file sharing platforms, there are more online stores shipping merchandises oversea. Back in the day, from where I live, I could never imagine I would be able to possess  an authentic Jpop CD, the internet was slow, there was a lot of spamming, there wasn't any fan subs, etc. Then there came livejournal era where you obtain the music illegally lol. Unable to access to jpop isn't the reason that Jpop doesn't appeal to international fans. It's more about different taste. That's why I don't really want to try to introduce Jpop to people I know. I do recommend songs, but if they don't seem to like it, then I will just let it pass. 

 

I've not joined any Jpop fan community for about 5 years until I find this forum. That doesn't make me less interested in Jpop either. 

 

The thing about access is that there is more access now compared to before. You just have to know where to look. YouTube is sometimes an option, sometimes it's not. You have to be willing to find out things for yourself. Like what do you like? What are you looking for? Everything is not going to be laid out for you. That's big difference between KPop and JPop. Everything in KPop is centered around idols who are all very similar. Meanwhile with JPop, it's a variety of genres to navigate. Some people just aren't up for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Japan isn't trying while Korea is though. There are totally different things at play here.

 

There are full videos in many places, just no YouTube.

 

There was much more of a community a decade ago compared to now. I've always been part of a community since I've been a fan, and the numbers have decreased. But I do see them growing now. Or maybe people are just joining together now?

 

But those things are non-music related though. The question is: are you here for drama or for the music? I see so many on people on the KPop side say that they don't care about KPop anymore and that they just want to see drama.

 

 

Exactly, Japan doesn't care to promote outside of Japan, that's why the official YT channels often block videos outside of Japan. I've even seen teasers for blurays blocked (that's just ridiculous...). So the question was why there's such a lack of J-pop community, and Japan not trying is one reason. Hell, they even make it hard for people who are already fans.

 

As for full videos, I know you can watch them in many other places, but I'm just talking about the official accounts which usually just upload a minute or so.

 

Well, the answers to this question are both music- and non-music related.

To answer your last one: I'm definitely here for the music, I'm just saying that drama helps keeps the community alive. I wish more music related discussions could dominate these threads but possibly because most people here are teens, drama is bound to abound.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't understand a lot of kpop fans who claim to be huge Jpop fans but because of the lack of access to materials that they decided to switch to Kpop. What kind of excuses is that? Why can't they just admit that they find Kpop more interesting instead?

 

In recent years we have youtube, fast internet, torrent and a lot of file sharing platforms, there are more online stores shipping merchandises oversea. Back in the day, from where I live, I could never imagine I would be able to possess  an authentic Jpop CD, the internet was slow, there was a lot of spamming, there wasn't any fan subs, etc. Then there came livejournal era where you obtain the music illegally lol. Unable to access to jpop isn't the reason that Jpop doesn't appeal to international fans. It's more about different taste. That's why I don't really want to try to introduce Jpop to people I know. I do recommend songs, but if they don't seem to like it, then I will just let it pass. 

 

I've not joined any Jpop fan community for about 5 years until I find this forum. That doesn't make me less interested in Jpop either. 

 

But the question isn't why isn't the J-pop community bigger, rather, why aren't the existing fans more active?

 

And people who say music isn't available will say that about K-pop too. But while Korean labels put up full MVs on their sites for everyone to watch, Japanese labels only upload snippets, and often block videos outside of Japan. Full videos uploaded by fans get taken down constantly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

Back to Top